BUSAN, Republic of Korea (April 30, 2011) The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN 727) passes silhouettes of the rain obscured Oryuk Islets, in background, as she arrives in Busan for a routine port visit. Oryuk translates to "five of six" because the height of the tide determines how the rocks are separated at the waters surface. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Jared Apollo Burgamy)

BUSAN, Republic of Korea (NNS) — Ohio-class guided missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN-727) arrived in Busan, Korea April 30, as part of its deployment to the Western Pacific.

"Michigan is forward deployed, bringing tremendous capabilities to the theater in support of our friends and allies," said Capt. Phil McLaughlin, USS Michigan commanding officer. "It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to visit the Republic of Korea and continue our relationship with one of our closest allies."

With a crew of approximately 155, Michigan will conduct a multitude of missions and showcase the latest capabilities of the submarine fleet.

"The crew has worked extremely hard sustaining our ship at sea," said Command Master Chief Bill Mast, USS Michigan chief of the boat. "It is a welcome break to visit Busan. We look forward to some well deserved rest while learning about the rich culture of such a close ally."

For many of the crew members, this is their first time visiting Busan.

"While in Busan, I am looking forward to visiting various cultural sites, eating the local cuisine, enjoying Haeundea Beach, and shopping at the various markets," said Sonar Technician (Submarines) 3rd Class Michael Jordan.

Michigan is capable of supporting missions that include anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, strike, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and naval special warfare utilizing special operations forces.

Measuring more than 560 feet long and weighing more than 18,800 tons when submerged, Michigan dominates the undersea battlespace with a combination of Tomahawk cruise missiles, special forces capabilities, and heavy weight torpedoes.

In addition to having the ability to deploy 154 tactical missiles, the sub can also be configured to support dedicated accommodations for significant numbers of special operations forces and their equipment. This is all supported by a nuclear power plant that provides station keeping time that is unmatched by conventionally powered ships.

Michigan's homeport is Bangor, Washington, yet it will spend 14 of its remaining 20-plus operational years forward deployed. Michigan is one of two SSGNs currently operating in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility.

For more news from Commander Submarine Group 7, visit www.navy.mil/local/csg7/.