Prepositioning ship supports exercise MALABAR 21

28 September 2021

From Leslie Hull-Ryde, Military Sealift Command Far East

USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304) took part in the annual maritime exercise that enhances planning, training and employment of advance warfare tactics between the Royal Australian Navy, Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and U.S. Navy.
Military Sealift Command’s prepositioning and seabasing ship, USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304), takes part in MALABAR 21 on Aug. 30.
USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304) takes part in MALABAR 21 on Aug. 30. (U.S. Navy photo by Capt. Tom Pearse-Drance)
Military Sealift Command’s prepositioning and seabasing ship, USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304), takes part in MALABAR 21 on Aug. 30.
USNS Pililaau takes part in MALABAR 21
USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304) takes part in MALABAR 21 on Aug. 30. (U.S. Navy photo by Capt. Tom Pearse-Drance)
Photo By: Capt. Tom Pearse-Drance
VIRIN: 210830-N-N1109-013
GUAM -- Military Sealift Command’s prepositioning and seabasing ship, USNS Pililaau (T-AKR 304), took part in MALABAR 21, an annual maritime exercise that enhances planning, training and employment of advance warfare tactics between the Royal Australian Navy, Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and U.S. Navy.

As part of Maritime Prepositioning Ships Squadron 3 (MPSRON 3), Pililaau strategically places U.S. Forces’ equipment and cargo throughout the Indo-Pacific Region. To get the right equipment to the right location at the right time, the ship’s crew must safely and expeditiously load and offload equipment during roll-on/roll-off (RO/RO) operations.

During the exercise, Pililaau supported units from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5 and Naval Special Warfare Command. “Throughout MALABAR, Naval Special Warfare Command exercised its ability to rapidly deploy forces and execute capabilities utilizing maritime prepositioning ships, like Pililaau,” said Capt. John Bub, commodore, MPSRON 3.

Elements of the Royal Australian, Indian, Japanese and United States maritime forces routinely operate together in the Indo-Pacific Region, fostering a cooperative approach toward regional security and stability.

MALABAR participants included the Indian Navy’s Shivalik-class multi-role stealth frigate INS Shivalik (F 47) and Kamorta-class anti-submarine warfare corvette INS Kiltan (P 30). Representing the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force was Izumo-class multi-purpose operation destroyer JS Kaga (DDH 184), and Murasame-class destroyers JS Murasame (DD 101) and JS Shiranui (DD 120). Representing Australia was Anzac-class frigate HMAS Warramonga (FFH 152).

Military Sealift Command Far East ensures ships in the Indo-Pacific region – including Pililaau – are manned, trained and equipped to deliver essential supplies, fuel, cargo and equipment to warfighters, both at sea and on shore. As the U.S. Navy's largest forward-deployed fleet, 7th Fleet employs 50-70 ships and submarines across the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. U.S. 7th Fleet routinely operates and interacts with 35 maritime nations while conducting missions to preserve and protect a free and open Indo-Pacific region.
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