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Scranton Returns from a Successful Deployment

08 September 2022

From Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Thomas Gooley

SAN DIEGO - The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Scranton (SSN 756) returned to Naval Base Point Loma after completing a successful extended western Pacific deployment, Sept. 7.

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SAN DIEGO (Sep. 7, 2022) The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Scranton (SSN 756) pulls into Naval Base Point Loma at the conclusion of a seven-month deployment, September 7. Scranton covered nearly 50,000 nautical miles during deployment and saw port visits in Guam, Yokosuka and Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Colby A. Mothershead)
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220907-N-JO829-1026
SAN DIEGO (Sep. 7, 2022) The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Scranton (SSN 756) pulls into Naval Base Point Loma at the conclusion of a seven-month deployment, September 7. Scranton covered nearly 50,000 nautical miles during deployment and saw port visits in Guam, Yokosuka and Okinawa. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Colby A. Mothershead)
Photo By: Colby A. Mothershead
VIRIN: 220907-N-JO829-1026

Under the leadership of Cmdr. Michael McGuire, Scranton’s commanding officer, the submarine is returning from a seven-month deployment in the 7th Fleet area of operations where the ship conducted multiple high-priority tasks, fostering cooperation in the Pacific while building and exercising combat power and expertise.

"Our time on deployment proved the submarine force is the most flexible deterrent available to our strategic planners against near peer competitors," said McGuire. "Scranton benefited greatly from the adaptive planning based on the dynamic operations in 7th Fleet. I can say without a doubt that the officers, chiefs and ship’s crew are better prepared to continue to defend our great nation.”

During the deployment, Scranton steamed approximately 50,000 nautical miles, crossed the International Date Line (IDL) and conducted port visits in Guam, Yokosuka and Okinawa.

“Crossing the IDL on the way home was a really exciting moment because it meant that we had completed the mission successfully and that gave me a sense of accomplishment,” said Yeoman (Submarine) 1st Class Esteban Gonzalez.

Similarly to Gonzalez’s excitement, Machinist’s Mate (Auxiliary) 1st Class Laurence Cuteri could not wait to be reunited with loved ones.

“I just can’t wait to get home and see my wife and kids and dogs,” said Cuteri. “That’s going to be a very special moment for me.”

The Los Angeles-class submarine is a fast-attack submarine equipped and designed for anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, insertion of special forces, mining counter measures, search and rescue, as well as show-of-force and strike missions.

Named after the city of Scranton, Penn., Scranton was built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, and was commissioned Jan. 26, 1991. The 360-foot ship is manned by roughly 15 officers and 140 enlisted Sailors.

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