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Ships and Sailors Safe, Naval Oceanography Tracks Super Typhoon in Western Pacific

30 May 2023

From By: Jonathan B. Holloway, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Public Affairs

“The information we gather is then disseminated and utilized for resource protection…making sure that our people and our assets [U.S. Navy Ships and Sailors] are protected and out of harm’s way ahead of these destructive systems,” said Mr. Brian Strahl, JTWC Director.
Recently, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s (Naval Oceanography) Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tracked Super Typhoon 02W (MAWAR) through the Western Pacific as the storm reached historic proportions.

MAWAR’s peak intensity was reported to have reached upwards of 160ktnots (184 mph). In times of severe and impactful weather hazards due to tropical cyclones, JTWC plays a vital role in protecting the Navy; Ships and Sailors alike.
Recently, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s (Naval Oceanography) Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tracked Super Typhoon 02W (MAWAR) through the Western Pacific as the storm reached historic proportions. MAWAR’s peak intensity was reported to have reached upwards of 160ktnots (184 mph). In times of severe and impactful weather hazards due to tropical cyclones, JTWC plays a vital role in protecting the Navy; Ships and Sailors alike.
Recently, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s (Naval Oceanography) Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tracked Super Typhoon 02W (MAWAR) through the Western Pacific as the storm reached historic proportions.

MAWAR’s peak intensity was reported to have reached upwards of 160ktnots (184 mph). In times of severe and impactful weather hazards due to tropical cyclones, JTWC plays a vital role in protecting the Navy; Ships and Sailors alike.
Ships and Sailors Safe, Naval Oceanography Tracks Super Typhoon in Western Pacific
Recently, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s (Naval Oceanography) Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tracked Super Typhoon 02W (MAWAR) through the Western Pacific as the storm reached historic proportions. MAWAR’s peak intensity was reported to have reached upwards of 160ktnots (184 mph). In times of severe and impactful weather hazards due to tropical cyclones, JTWC plays a vital role in protecting the Navy; Ships and Sailors alike.
Photo By: Jonathan B. Holloway
VIRIN: 230526-D-CC745-784


STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss
. ——Recently, U.S. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command’s (Naval Oceanography) Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tracked Super Typhoon 02W (MAWAR) through the Western Pacific as the storm reached historic proportions.

MAWAR’s peak intensity was reported to have reached upwards of 160ktnots (184 mph). In times of severe and impactful weather hazards due to tropical cyclones, JTWC plays a vital role in protecting the Navy; Ships and Sailors alike.

“JTWC provides monitoring and analyzing of forecasts, warning on tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean, and the Southern Hemisphere for Department of Defense, and other U.S. agencies and allies operating in the region,” said Mr. Brian Strahl, JTWC Director.

The U.S. Navy has a serious presence throughout the entire Indo-Pacific region─where significant naval operations are conducted─and JTWC’s area-of-responsibility covers more than 65 million square miles where tropical cyclones are known to form.
“The information we gather is then disseminated and utilized for resource protection…making sure that our people and our assets [U.S. Navy Ships and Sailors] are protected and out of harm’s way ahead of these destructive systems,” said Strahl.

The information JTWC provides is primarily to protect military and partners, however the information distributed still holds altruistic purpose.
 
“Our [JTWC] products are provided to forward-deployed METOC professionals who use the data to inform Commanders and other decision makers at all U.S. military bases in the Pacific.   That same information is made available and used by countless countries to help keep their citizenry informed and protected, meteorologically-speaking,” said U.S. Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Officer, LT Steven Backofen.

Naval Oceanography and its subordinate commands, like JTWC use weather forecasts and distinct data to help protect United States citizens and their military, yet the information still finds it way for a global-good.

The island of Guam was expected to be hit hard by Super Typhoon MAWAR.

“We provided tropical cyclone warnings from DOD to the National Weather Service in Guam, which then uses the information to inform the government of Guam and subsequently local emergency managers, so it’s certainly our hope that everyone is safe there,” said Strahl.

JTWC’s mission is to enable effective Fleet and Joint Force planning and operations through tropical cyclone forecasts, warnings, and environmental decision support to U.S. assets in the Pacific and Indian Oceans as established by Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command.

 Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command directs and oversees more than 2,500 globally-distributed military and civilian personnel who collect, process, and exploit environmental information to assist Fleet and Joint Commanders in all warfare areas to make better decisions, based on assured environmental information, faster than the adversary.

For more information about JTWC: https://www.metoc.navy.mil/jtwc/jtwc.html

Follow Naval Oceanography on Facebook and Instagram (@NavalOceanography), Twitter (@NavyOceans), and LinkedIn.
 
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